Consumers loathe product waste because of money, mindset and the environment

By Rick Lingle in Optimization on November 19, 2014

Those saving-food-type-of-initiatives launched over the past few years don’t have to do much to convince consumers that waste is bad: A new survey released today points to the overwhelming fact that consumers hate waste—and packaging that causes it.

 

According to a LiquiGlide Inc. survey of more than 1,000 consumers that released today, consumers would rather go to the dentist than waste consumer products.

 

Ouch.

 

That’s especially telling because those dental visits likely cost them a lot more: The majority of respondents, at 60%, estimated that they lost between $1 and $49 annually because of waste, though one-third felt they wasted $50 or more worth of product wasted each year.

 

And while it IS about the money—wasted money tops this response with 60% of respondents—it’s not the only thing that motivates consumers: It’s also about the principle of the matter; 20% of respondents said they should get everything out of container that they paid for.

Also, one-sixth cited environmental concerns.

 

A major packaging-centered takeaway from among LiquiGlide’s press materials (we extracted two charts that appear above from a lengthy infographic that was provided): More than 80% and up to 93% of consumers are willing to try new packaging in major categories including toothpaste, lotion, shampoo and mayonnaise (see right side of above image).

 

Consumers’ frustration with packaging that refuses to give up those last bits of product leads them to take measures into their own hands including these top 5 ways:

84% stored bottles upside down;

68% added water;

61% cut containers open;

40% use spatulas;

19% use centrifugal force.

Other more extreme methods included smashing, heating, stepping on, licking, sucking and biting.

 

I’ll admit to using four of the above methods; what about you? We invite you to comment on this article below.

 

Dave Smith, LiquiGlide CEO, provided these responses to our questions:

What was the biggest surprise? 

Smith: The biggest surprise for us was how passionately consumers felt about getting every last drop of their products and the great lengths they will go to, to get it. 97% of respondents admit to using different methods for getting the last drops, including cutting open the packaging, adding water or even using special tools. We knew consumers hated waste, but couldn't have predicted how dedicated they were to getting every last drop of their products.

 

What was your takeaway?

Smith: Consumers are demanding a solution to their product packaging woes. They really hate the waste and the overwhelming majority said they would even switch brands to avoid it. LiquiGlide's technology offers the perfect solution to this issue, eliminating waste for consumers and offering a strong differentiator to brands.

 

Although the survey information is not available online, LiquiGlide informs us that anyone interested in the survey and results may contact Mark Daly at press@liquiglide.com

 

LiquiGlide’s product is a permanently wet, hyper-slippery coating applied to the interior of containers by the packager prior to filling that allows all of a product to be dispensed or evacuated. For more information on LiquiGlide, please see these articles at Packaging Digest:

Our latest LiquiGlide update this month from Pack Expo;

LiquiGlide applications and spray coating in action;

Super Bowl packaging ad prompts LiquiGlide reaction;

LiquiGlide gives foods the slip to reduce waste.

Filed Under:

3 Comments

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.
500 characters remaining
Thank you for sharing. This is a very interesting article! I created a packaging lift innovation that lifts, scrapes and suspends contents inside jar and containers. The innovation also has the capacity to dispense contents inside flexible or rigid packaged products formed to drop in oppose to removing contents from one container and adding into another. Here you will find the link to my video demo: http://youtu.be/s6JmqqOvm3c Thanks again for sharing. -Ron
I admit that I use some of these techniques to get every drop out. It's the principle. I give you so much money and you give me X amount of product--not X minus a bit. It's only fair.
Of course I am doing it to save money as well as the environment. It costs a lot of effort but it worth it. I would wellcome every packaging that help me avoiding the efforts.