Busting the top 5 myths of crowdsourced beauty packaging design

By Mike Samson in Packaging Design on July 15, 2015

In recent years, a new concept has presented exciting alternatives in the world of beauty packaging: crowdsourcing. The result has been a boon for the industry, inviting innovative designs, new ideas and a diversity of voices to contribute to the beauty packaging aesthetics.

Still, a number of people continue to question whether or not crowdsourcing is a positive development when it comes to beauty packaging design. Here, we disprove five myths about crowdsourcing in this arena.

 

Myth #1: Crowdsourcing package design produces poor quality packaging.

Fact: Putting beauty package design in the hands of the crowd produces great concepts and designs. The crowd is going to produce a number of innovative and even earth-friendly ideas that revolve around minimizing package materials and eliminating the plastic that many beauty products are packaged in. Brimming with fresh ideas, the crowd is more likely to replace old-school, outdated concepts like toxic/flammable aerosol hairspray cans with something more eco-friendly.

 

Next...

 

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Learn about the latest developments in trends and innovative designs in health and beauty packaging at WestPack 2016, Feb. 9-11 in Anaheim, CA.

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4 Comments

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Would the companies who use "crowdsourcing" give away their products so that we can then choose which to pay for? This is spec work, and is unethical no matter what you call it.
Agreed completely. We are established designers and we don't need to compete like children to get work.
I don't like any of the packaging designs presented here. They look like there was not much thought put in it, or that it was a simple student design.
Agreed: "Would the companies who use "crowdsourcing" give away their products so that we can then choose which to pay for? This is spec work, and is unethical no matter what you call it." Crowdsourcing exploits creatives.