Strong packaging graphics also need ‘context’: Page 2 of 2

By Lisa McTigue Pierce in Packaging Design on November 06, 2017

Eye-tracking study results

Shumpert, a Clemson University graduate familiar with eye-tracking technology, managed the eye-tracking study, and now provides more details and an analysis of the results:

Package InSight coordinated an eye-tracking study at the CUshop, a consumer experience laboratory at Clemson University’s Sonoco Institute of Packaging Design and Graphics, to quantify the on-shelf appeal of the jerky packages. CUshop is a realistic shopping environment featuring three 12-foot shopping aisles, a frozen food section, produce area and simulated open refrigeration.

“The purpose of eye tracking is to eliminate subjective bias and capture consumers’ reactions at the point of sale as they would occur at the store. Participants were asked to shop for beef jerky.

“The products in the jerky study stayed static and there was no positional bias from the planogram setup. The likely winner on an end cap, if there was a positional bias, would be the top left. The top left has been proven to be the highest attractor of attention on an end-cap display.

“The results were that 50% purchased the Chef’s Cut jerky, 33% purchased the Jack Link’s and 17% purchased the Oberto brand during the short pilot study of 12 people on October 13. Clemson graduate students and undergraduate students participated in this study; and we had 55% female and 45% male breakdown.

“These three graphs show more data to explain the heat map (above), specifically the Total Fixation Duration graph.

“The time in seconds from when a product first enters a participant’s field of view until they fixate on it is defined as the Time To First Fixation (TTFF). The lower the number, the better the package performed in this instance. TTFF starts when the eye hits the defined Area of Analysis (AOA), so run order was not an issue. TFD (Total Fixation Duration), is the time, in seconds, spent on average by participants fixating on this item. The higher the number, the better the package performed. This metric measures the sum of the duration of all fixations within an Area of Interest (AOI). Fixation Count (FC) is the total number of times a participant’s scan of the planogram crossed into a particular area of interest.

“Looking at the Total Fixation Duration graph, Chef’s Cut performed the best within the competitive array, however not significantly better than the Oberto brand. It was looked at 30% longer than Jack Link's and 60% longer than The Snack Artist.

“For the Time To First Fixation metric, Jack Links and Chef’s cut were noticed the quickest, though not significantly different from each other or the Oberto brand. All three were noticed quicker than the Snack Artist brand. Jack Link’s was noticed 64% quicker than The Snack Artist, Chef’s Cut 57% quicker and Oberto 44% quicker.

“For the Fixation Count metric, Oberto was looked at the most times, though not significantly different than either Chef’s Cut or Jack Link’s. All three were looked at significantly more times than The Snack Artist. Oberto was looked at 58% more times, Chef’s Cut 53% more times and Jack Link’s 47% more times.

“A further analysis can be performed to identify what specific aspects of the jerky pouches drew consumers’ attention. The next step in the typical Package InSight process is to redesign the target package leveraging the data gathered in the study. Design, Test, Redesign.

“By using a combination of subjective and objective data, through a process of trial and error, any consumer brand can go to market with the confidence that they will succeed on shelf.

“If you’re interested in adding eye tracking to your marketing toolkit, contact Drew Felty at drew@packageinsight.com.”

 

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I agree with the notion.Coming up with a great context can help in coming up with a great packaging graphics. We apply the same principle in our <a href="http://www.digitalrescue.com.au/">web design company</a>.