Thisfish coding system maps seafood path from catch to consumer

By Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce in Computer Software Services on May 03, 2011

 

Thisfish coding system maps seafood path from catch to consumerConsumers are growing increasingly concerned about where their food comes from, both for their own safety and the sustainability of the planet. To meet consumer demand Ecotrust Canada has launched Thisfish in partnership with local fishermen and processors in British Columbia and Atlantic Canada. Thisfish connects fishermen to seafood lovers like never before, creating an unprecedented level of transparency and trust in the seafood supply chain.

 

Thisfish consists of a system to tag seafood and trace it using unique codes from ocean to plate. When fishermen land their catch, they tag individual fish or entire fish lots with a unique code. Information about the fish—who caught it, where, when, how—is linked to the code and uploaded to Thisfish.ca. As the fish travels through the supply chain, from sea to supermarket, each seafood business can upload additional information about how it was handled and processed. Ultimately, consumers, retailers and restaurateurs can use the unique code to retrieve details about the seafood they purchase.

 

Thisfish is currently being beta tested by a network of trusted fishermen and processors in British Columbia and Atlantic Canada. Partners include the Canadian Council for Professional Fish Harvesters, Maritime Fishermen's Union, West Coast Area G Trollers Assn., the Pacific Coast Fishermen's Conservation Co., BC Dogfish Hook and Line Assn. and the Vancouver Island Seafood Buyers Assn. The tagging system and online database and tracing tool with fishermen and processors is in beta test. Within the next six months or so, Thisfish expects to have a new—and much improved—website up and running.

 

Source: Thisfish


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