7 best-read food and beverage packaging articles of 2017: Page 6 of 6

Rick Lingle in Food Packaging on December 12, 2017

 

At the top of our bestseller list we reach the lofty “evergreen” portion of our coverage, a term we use for older articles that have amazing stamina in continuing to draw reader interest many months after they have been published. Such is the case for the Top 2 most-read articles of 2017, starting with the runner-up that resonated as much with readers this past year as it did when posted in May 2016.

It’s a trends piece, but obviously one whose focus on only the fast-moving trends in food and beverages struck a nerve with the audience for packaging’s largest market segment. One of those trends is Personalization. Mintel’s global packaging director David Luttenberger explains that “there’s a parallel path between brands striving to engage customers on a more personal level and consumers’ expectations for packaging to deliver that experience.”  Technological advancements help drive the surge of personalization.

The second trend identified as for Cleaner and clearer labeling, wherein consumers are demanding that the labeling on their food and drinks packaging is clear and concise. When trying to choose which products to buy, consumers don’t want packaging to be overloaded with messages; they want the most important information—such as ingredients and nutritional value, function and safety—to be communicated to them in ways that are visibly clear and easy to understand so that they can make informed purchasing without confusion. More information on these and two more trends can be found in 4 fast-moving trends in food and beverage packaging.

And now we present the #1 "bestselling" article of 2017 as measured by readership numbers, another of Packaging Digest’s evergreen features, this one that continues to collect solid interest monthly since it was posted in April 2016. It was our interview with Justin Johnson, principal of More Branding, a design agency, in a feature  article that centered on the firm’s design work for Delici, a high-end dessert in premium packaging sold exclusively at Costco. The chilled product is a beautifully layered and luxuriously presented single-serve dessert glass. Johnson said the visual beauty of the dessert flavors drove the engineering and design of the package.

Upscale meant that the design team atypically chose heavyweight glass cups. “Those have been a huge factor in the success of this product,” Johnson said. “Real glass gives the product a high-end feel, they are reusable and it gives the package an unexpected weightiness.”

Other packaging components include a plastic lid that seals each cup, a 6-pack thermoformed plastic tray and a glossy, “perfect tolerance/tension-tight product sleeve with heavy varnish.”

The result was a deftly-executed packaging design that delivered the goods for Costco and its customers told through an article that delivered the editorial goods to broad-based and attentive audience. The entire success story is served up in Decadent Delici dessert packaging designed for Costco.

Because you’ve read this far, we offer you a special preview teaser of a coming attraction: Johnson has created another upscale package with a decidely unique format that we’ll be presenting in early 2018. 

Lastly, we offer a toast of thanks to all the brands, companies and managers in 2017 who gave up their time and information to work with us in a way that cumulatively benefits the packaging community. We also look forward to another year of exciting packaging developments, so cheers to all for a prosperous and innovative 2018!

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Hungry for packaging information and ideas? You’ll find that and a whole lot more served up in generous portions during WestPack in Anaheim, CA, February 6-8, 2018. For more information, visit WestPack.

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not clicking to second page, making me play your games to increase ad rev by some shit percent?