David Bellm

January 29, 2014

2 Min Read
MSU teams with IFPTI for food processing safety training

The International Food Protection Training Institute (IFPTI) and the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (CANR) at Michigan State University announced that they are collaborating in the delivery of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) course, “Food Processing and Technology.” The four and one-half day course, which is being delivered February 22–25 at CANR, provides an overview of the basic principles in food processing, technology and associated equipment used to ensure the safety of manufactured foods.

“We are pleased to partner with the IFPTI in delivering this critical training to state, tribal and federal food investigators. Partnerships are increasingly important if we are to continue to assure a safe food supply for consumers”

Participants include state, tribal and federal food investigators and inspectors from regulatory agencies having oversight of U.S. food manufacturing facilities, and investigators and inspectors who are or will become a "qualified trainer" as referenced in the Manufactured Food Regulatory Program Standards, Standard 2. The FDA is providing the instructors. The Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) requested the course for delivery in Michigan.

“The skills and knowledge obtained by investigators through this course will provide a strong foundation in food safety inspections for manufactured foods,” said Gerald Wojtala, Acting Executive Director of IFPTI.

The FDA’s Food Processing and Technology course is being taught in a pilot laboratory setting at CANR and incorporates extensive “hands-on” experience with processing equipment demonstrations and operations. Coursework includes detailed studies of food microbiology, food characteristics and properties, food chemistry, thermal processing and heat transfer, fluid flow, emerging technologies, preservation technologies, fillers and packaging technology.

“We are pleased to partner with the IFPTI in delivering this critical training to state, tribal and federal food investigators. Partnerships are increasingly important if we are to continue to assure a safe food supply for consumers,” said Jeffrey D. Armstrong, dean of the MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

SOURCE: MSU CANR

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